Imagine the possibilities... They now are a reality!!

Mountain View Equine Hospital, your state of the art equine sports
medicine facility offers Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

Located at MVEH and offers state of the art 
diagnostic imaging in the fields of digital radiography,
digital  ultrasonography, and MRI.

Just stop by to view the facility or call to  set up a scan.


(click images to enlarge view)

  • Fetlock-cyst
  • Foot-ddft-(2)
  • Foot-navicular
  • Mri-hock
  • MRi1
  • MRI10
  • MRI2
  • MRI3
  • MRI4
  • MRI5
  • MRI6
  • MRI7
  • MRI8
  • MRI9
  • OsiriX
  • Dog-brain1
  • Dogbrain2
  • Dogstifle
 
1.  WHAT IS AN MRI

Magnetic Resonance Imaging involves a strong magnet and the radiowave interaction between the magnet and the hydrogen atoms in the body.  When the magnet field and radiowaves are on the hydrogen atoms in the body begin to align with the magnetic field in normal tissue and release energy.  The magnet pulls on the hydrogen atoms and the radiowaves (pulses of energy) spin and stop the atoms.  The variation in the way the atoms react is recorded as energy.  This energy generates a signal that goes back to the computer and generates an image of the body part and tissue composition. 

2.  IS THERE RADIATION DANGER ASSOCIATED WITH AN MRI SCAN?

No.  The MRI uses a magnetic field and no radiation is involved.

3. WHAT IS THE INDICATION FOR PERFOMING AN MRI?

Any time your veterinarian has narrowed down a problem to a specific area on the body and other routine diagnostic imaging cannot pinpoint an exact diagnosis, that is the time for an MRI.  MRI is also useful in determining chronicity of a problem and determine if a treatment is working.  Ultrasound may only show normal tendon alignment but an MRI may demonstrate some abnormal density still present that may keep animals from returning to full function.

4. WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN HIGH AND LOW FIELD MAGNETS?

The big difference is time.  The high field magnet allows shorter scan times than the low field magnet.  The standing low field magnets can have a lot of distortion due to motion and can hinder the quality of the image. 

5. WILL INSURANCE PAY FOR AN MRI?

Most insurance companies will cover at least 50% of the MRI fee.

6. WHO PERFORMS THE SCANS?

Our MRI scans are performed by Dr. Scott Reiners our boarded surgeon.  He is also an orthopedic specialist and a member of the International Society of Equine Locomotor Pathology.

7. WHO READS THE IMAGES?

Dr. Reiners and Dr. Alexia McKnight of McKnight Insight both read the MRI scans.  Dr. McKnight is a boarded radiologist who formerly worked at the New Bolton Center.  Her advanced training is in MRI of humans and animals.

8. WHY DOES THE ANIMAL HAVE TO BE ANESTHETIZED?

The hydrogen atoms are very sensitive to distortion in the magnetic field.  It is very important that in order to get the best image the animal is perfectly still.  The only way to ensure the best quality image is to anesthetize the patient.

9. ARE THERE RISKS INVOLVED?

There is no risk in the actual MRI.  We perform preoperative bloodwork screening to look for potential problems that may arise under anesthesia to prevent anesthetic complications.  We also have highly trained and qualified licensed veterinary technicians and veterinarians constantly monitoring the patients as well as state of the art anesthesia machines and monitoring equipment.  We rope recover all equine patients to help guide them to their feet on recovery and minimize injury.

10. WHAT SHOULD I EXPECT WHEN I BRING MY PET TO THE HOSPITAL?

It is best to bring any paperwork that you may have from your veterinarian with you.  If you do not have any paperwork make sure your veterinarian is in touch with Dr. Reiners prior to arrival.

If your pet is a small animal you will need to remove food at midnight the night before and no food or water the morning of the scan.  You will need to plan on dropping off your pet for the day.  The preoperative workup will take at least an hour and the MRI scan can take 1-1.5 hours.  The patient will need to be completely awake and stable on their feet before we will discharge them.

If your pet is a large animal you will need to bring them in the day before the scan.  We will perform preoperative screening and remove the shoes prior to the scan.  Again the scan will take 1-1.5 hours and horses can take awhile at times to arise from anesthesia.  You can pick them up late the day of the scan or first thing the following morning.

In both cases you will need to fill out paperwork on arrival and payment is due in full at the time of discharge.  We accept all major credit cards, cash, check, Care Credit, and Chase Medical.

11. HOW SOON WILL HAVE A REPORT?

Dr. Reiners will email the scan to Dr. McKnight that day and she will usually have a report back to us within 2 business days.

12. WHO SHOULD I CALL IF QUESTIONS?

Feel free to contact us at the clinic with any questions.  Michelle or Dr. Reiners will be happy to try to answer any questions you may have about the MRI.

You can also email Dr. Reiners anytime at sreiners@hughesnet.com.